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Siler Bald

August 23, 2015

Special: Smokies Edition

Introductory Guide to Visiting Great Smoky Mountains National Park Area

Not to be confused with Silers Bald in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, this 8.8 mile hike in Nantahala National Forest has some of the best views in the southern Appalachians – mountains roll out in every direction from the summit.  The hike is moderate and doesn’t require any tough climbing or tricky terrain.

View the Full Album of Photos From This Hike

We thought this video really showcased how amazing the view is from Siler Bald!  Sorry it’s so shaky!

Adam Says…

One thing we hoped to do on our trip was to hike some new piece of the Appalachian Trail.  While it would have been nice to complete a larger section of the trail, when you only have one car you are stuck with doing some out-and-backs.  When we were researching some different options we came upon Siler Bald.  My first thought was “Didn’t we already hike this another time?”  Oh, that was SilerS Bald, not Siler Bald.  I always get a kick out of how many mountains and hikes have similar names.  We have come across several Chimney Rocks in our travels.  It reminds me of the unoriginal naming of cities in New England.  You can find multiple Manchesters, Andovers, Portsmouths, Dovers, and Salems in the New England states, as if their goal is to get you lost when you try to navigate with your GPS.  The nice thing about both of these similarly-named balds is they have great views so you can’t go wrong.

There wasn’t a GPS signal when we started this hike, so it was a little difficult to find the starting point.  I had a map of the area and we were able to find the parking lot easily enough. The Appalachian Trail crosses over Hwy-64 near the parking lot.  The southbound path is easy to find, it takes off from the parking lot.  However, the northbound path was harder to find.  I crossed the road and walked down the road heading east for about a hundred feet.  Then, I saw the AT cut through on a small, overgrown path.  I signaled back up to Christine that I found it and we began our hike.

Small Waterfall near Winding Stair Gap

There was a pretty small waterfall near the beginning of the hike. Below: Winding Stair Gap; National Forest Information, Stream crossing and nice campsite.

Parking at Winding Stair Gap Nantahala National Forest Sign Stream and Nice Campsites

Heading into the woods, the white-blazed trail starts on a very gradual uphill slope.  Like many parts of the AT, this hike can be called a green tunnel – one path cutting through lush, green forest.  We reached a waterfall and forest service road in .2 miles, followed shortly by a stream crossing and a nice campsite area.  The trail then continues uphill as you pass by Swinging Lick Gap at 1.1 miles and Panther Gap at 2 miles.  Right before the sign of Panther Gap, we were startled as 5 grouse took off across the trail just ahead of us.  When you are walking along the trail with nothing but the sounds of the woods around you, a big move from the brush can you make you almost leap out of your hiking boots.  From Panther Gap, the trail then goes slightly downhill for about a quarter of a mile before going gradually uphill.  We eventually reached a junction trail at 4.2 miles.  The trail branches off to the Siler Bald Shelter, which is about .5 mile from this junction (this trail eventually loops around to the other side if you see it out after the summit).  We didn’t take the trip to the shelter since we were getting hungry and wanted to make our way to the views.

Scarlet Flycatch

There were still some colorful things growing and blooming along the trail.

Orange Azalea Fungus Yellow Wildflowers

Continuing on the AT, we met another junction with the Siler Bald summit trail.  From here, we took the path up the hillside, requiring us to almost bushwhack through this thick, tall grass and brush for a short distance before we came out of it.  We climbed a very steep .2 miles to reach the summit of Siler Bald at 4.4 miles.  As you are climbing up, if you look behind you the views start opening up of the mountains around you, but when you reach the summit the views are spectacular.  Having hiked without seeing anyone the entire day, we were surprised to see a thru-hiker at the top.  He was hoping to get a ride into town, having a craving for a pizza.  We talked with him for a while and were pleased to find out he was from Virginia as well.  He made a call to have someone meet him at the trailhead and he was off in a flash. We ate our lunch and enjoyed the views all to ourselves.  On our way back down, we did come across a few other people that were out for a backpacking trip.  This hike is one that has outstanding views for a minimal effort and is not as well-traveled.

Appalachian Trail Near Siler Bald

The trail was green and lush.  Below: Tunnels of mountain laurel;  There was a shelter on a side trail – we skipped visiting; Making our way up to the top of the bald.

Rhododendron Tunnel Siler Bald Shelter Sign Climbing the Bald

Christine Says…

Three and a half days in the Smokies just aren’t enough!  On our 2015 stay, we tried two new hikes in the park (Ramsey Cascades and Gregory Bald), revisited an old favorite (Charlies Bunion), and then picked something new! For our final hike of the trip, we chose a hike outside the park borders – Siler Bald.  This hike is located just south of the park in Nantahala National Forest. It offers a spectacular, panoramic vista from a spur just off the Appalachian Trail.

We parked our car at Winding Stair Gap.  There is a good-sized lot along Hwy-64.  From the parking area, we crossed the highway and picked up the Appalachian Trail heading north.  In the first couple tenths of a mile, we crossed a footbridge over a pretty small waterfall.  On the other side of the bridge, there was a kiosk with information about the forest. Shortly after the sign, we crossed a wider stream with a lovely backcounty campsite next to it.

Almost to the Top of Siler Ba

This was about the moment we realized ‘Wow… mountains everywhere!’ Below: Siler Bald scenery.

So Many Mountains from Siler Bald Lake Nantahala Summit Campsite and Marker on Siler Bald

We hiked along, enjoying the abundance of interesting wildflowers and fungi. The climb was steady and slow.  It was by far the easiest hike of our trip.  We chuckled at the random sign posts in the woods declaring that a particular spot was a ‘gap’.  None of the gaps really seemed to be low points between mountains, nevertheless their were signs indicating that we had passed through Swinging Lick Gap, Panther Gap, and Snowbird Gap. Other than enjoying the pleasant weather and small things along the trail, there’s nothing grand along the way to Siler Bald.  The grandeur all comes shortly after you reach a grassy clearing about 4 miles into the hike.

From the grassy clearing, climb the spur trail steeply up through the meadow for .2 miles.  When we visited, the meadow was full of tall grasses and daisies.  At the very top, we reached a flat opening that looked out across what seemed like all of the southern Appalachians. We had great views of Standing Indian mountain, Wayah Bald, Lake Nantahala, and even into Georgia.

Storm Clouds

Storm clouds started to roll in. Below: Mountain views on the descent; Small waterfall

Starting the Hike Down Bridge at the Bottom

There’s a marker at the top of the bald declaring the mountain’s name and elevation (5,216 feet).  There’s also an established fire pit and plenty of room for several tents.  What a place to watch both sunrise and sunset!

Adam and I ate our lunch (so many peanut butter and jelly sandwiches on this trip), took lots photos, and spent some time chatting with a fellow Virginian we met atop the summit.  Rambling Wreck was his name, and he was doing a flip-flop thru-hike of the Appalachian Trail.  He was really the only person we saw all day until we were almost done with our hike.

Nachos and Beers at the NOC

Nachos and Beers at the NOC.

The NOC

As we enjoyed the bald, darker clouds started to roll in.  We knew thunderstorms were forecast for later in the day, so we decided to make our way down.  The descent from the bald is nearly as magnificent as being on top – walking downhill with all the mountains laid out before me was breathtaking!  I was probably paying too much attention to the view, because the toe of my shoe got hooked on a root hidden by deep grass.  I took one of those epic falls that happen so fast you can do nothing to stop and catch yourself.  I faceplanted and ended up with several deep, painful bruises, but nothing that stopped me from hiking on.  When you’re a regular hiker, these things are bound to happen sooner or later!

The hike down went quickly and soon we arrived back at our car.  We decided to make the drive out to the Nantahala Outdoor Center (NOC) for our next stop.  On the way, we were pounded by thunderstorms.  I’m glad we missed them on the trail!  At the NOC we grabbed an outdoor riverside table at Big Wesser Brew and BBQ (one of our favorite spots) and shared nachos and a couple beers. Super day!

Trail Notes

  • Distance – 8.8 miles
    (Check out the stats from Map My Hike)*
  • Elevation Change – 1737 ft.
  • Difficulty – 3.  The climbing on this trail is all easy to moderate until the last couple tenths of a mile, up to the top of the bald.
  • Trail Conditions – 4.  The trail was nice, smooth, dirt with very few rocky sections.
  • Views  5.  Breathtaking, expansive, amazing, beautiful!
  • Streams/Waterfalls – 2.  There were a couple small streams and a small waterfall near the beginning of the hike.
  • Wildlife – 3. We saw some bear scat on the trail, so I’m sure bear sightings happen in this area.
  • Ease to Navigate – 3. The trail is clearly blazed and the spur to Siler Bald is pretty obvious.
  • Solitude – 4.  We saw one thru-hiker atop the bald and one group of four men backpacking together.  It has immensely more solitude than trails in GSMNP.

Download a Trail Map (PDF)

Directions to trailhead:  GPS coordinates for this trailhead are 35.12175, -83.54435. It is located on US 64,  11 miles west of Franklin, NC.  There is a spacious parking lot at Winding Stair Gap. From the parking lot, cross the road, head east about 100 feet, and begin hiking north along the Appalachian Trail.

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