Trails in George Washington National Forest

Forest Service Rules for George Washington and Jefferson National Forests

  • Appalachian Trail – Hog Camp Gap to the Tye River
    (19.5 miles, elevation 3172 ft, includes views from Tar Jacket Ridge, Spy Rock and the Priest)
  • Appalachian Trail – Hog Camp Gap to Punchbowl Mountain
    (17 miles, elevation gain: 2900 ft. – first day views, camping shelter)
  • Appalachian Trail – Tye River to Mau-Har Trail Junction
    (3.8 miles, elevation 1100 ft., suspension bridge and obstructed views of The Priest)
  • Beards Mountain – Douthat State Park
    (7 miles, elevation gain: 1400 ft. – decent views of the lake)
  • Big Schloss – Lee Ranger District
    (4 miles, elevation gain: 1000 ft. – spectacular views)
  • Bird Knob -Emerald Pond
    (8.3 miles, elevation gain: 1650 ft. – great views and a pretty pond)
  • Bird Knob – Browns Hollow Loop
    (11 miles, elevation gain:2290 ft. – great views, pond, stream/waterfall)
  • Buzzard Rock – Lee Ranger District
    (4 miles, elevation gain: 650 ft. – nice views)
  • Cole/Cold Mountain – Glenwood & Pedlar Ranger District
    (6 miles, elevation gain: 1490 ft. – spectacular views, open meadows)
  • Crabtree Falls – Glenwood & Pedlar Ranger District
    (3.4 miles, elevation gain: 1000 ft. – waterfall, very crowded trail)
  • Duncan Knob – Lee Ranger District
    (3.5 miles, elevation gain: 1200 ft. – spectacular views, fun rock scramble)
  • Duncan Knob Backpacking Loop – Lee Ranger District
    (9 miles, elevation gain: 1780 ft., nice views, but the trail tends to get sloppy)
  • Flat Run Trail – Douthat State Park
    (5 miles, bike ride, elevation gain: none – along a scenic creek)
  • Fridley Gap Loop
    (6 miles, elevation gain: 1417 ft,  a couple nice views, pretty stream, great backcountry camping)
  • Halfmoon Mountain Loop
    (10 miles, elevation gain: 2022, a decent view and camping)
  • Hanging Rock 
    (7.25 miles, elevation gain: 1942 ft. – views, AT shelter)
  • Hidden Rocks
    (2.5 miles, elevation gain: 390 ft, rock walls and some obstructed views)
  • Hone Quarry Ridge – Dry River Ranger District
    (5 miles, one nice view, near a GWNF established campground)
  • Kaylor Knob – Lee Ranger District
    (3.3 miles, elevation gain: 450 ft. – decent views)
  • Kennedy Peak – Lee Ranger District
    (4.75 miles, elevation gain: 400 ft. – excellent views, fire tower)
  • Kepler Overlook
    (6 miles, elevation gain: 1100 ft – nice views, great backcountry camping)
  • Massanutten Ridge Trail – Massanutten Resort
    (4 miles, elevation gain: 1000 ft. – nice views, feral goats)
  • Massanutten Story Book Trail – Lee Ranger District
    (.5 miles, elevation gain: none – pretty views, wheelchair accessible)
  • Mount Pleasant – Glenwood & Pedlar Ranger District
    (5.4 miles, elevation gain: 1350 ft. – pretty views, two summits)
  • The Priest – Glenwood & Pedlar Ranger District
    (2.8 miles, elevation gain: 1000 ft. – nice views, recommend 4WD to get to trailhead)
  • Shrinemont to North Mountain Rocks
    (5.6 miles, elevation gain: 1545 ft – nice views, interesting cliffside)
  • Signal Knob
    (10.2 miles, elevation gain: 2159 ft. – ok views)
  • Strickler Knob – via Scothorn Gap – Lee Ranger District
    (5.5 miles, elevation gain: 1600 ft. – fantastic views, fun rock scramble)
  • Strickler Knob – via Massanutten Trailhead
    (9.1 miles, elevation gain: 2250 ft. – tough climbing, fantastic views, fun rock scramble)
  • Three Ridges
    (13.2 miles, elevation gain: 3900 ft.  amazing views, streams/small waterfall)
  • Tibbet Knob – Lee Ranger District
    (3.1 miles, elevation gain: 830 ft. – excellent views)
  • Trimble Mountain – North River Ranger District
    (4 miles, elevation gain: 1050 ft. – ok views, close to Todd Lake)
  • Veach Gap – Morgan’s Road Fort Valley
    (7 miles, elevation gain: 1100 ft. – nice views of the river, interesting geology)
  • Woodstock Tower – Lee Ranger District
    (2 miles, elevation gain: 500 ft. – great views, fire tower)

2 thoughts on “Trails in George Washington National Forest

  1. Heather L Carvell

    Dear Christine and Adam,
    Thank you for hosting this amazing site. It’s the best trail guide I’ve found. Three in my family of four are avid hikers, so it’s always a balance to find hikes to excite the fourth (age 13) that are strenuous or interesting enough for the most serious hiker (age 17). Rock scrambles are usually a hit with both, but I seem to have some vertigo like you do, Christine. I was so pleased to read your incredibly helpful comments on various scrambles.
    I’m so excited to have found your site. I have *never* written to site hosts before–that’s how impressed I am by your work here!
    Gratefully,
    Heather C.

    Like

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