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Sherando Lake Loop

March 31, 2014

This relatively easy 2.5 mile loop goes around Sherando Lake and follows a short spur to a great mountain view!

View the Full Album of Photos From This Hike

Sherando Lake

Sherando Lake is a popular camping/swimming area for locals. It’s just several miles off the Blue Ridge Parkway.

Adam Says…

This has been quite the harsh winter for snow and cold temperatures.  And when it hasn’t been too cold, it seems to have been raining.  So, we were glad to get out on a nice day to get a little exercise outdoors for a change.

Sherando Lake is a multi-purpose recreation area.  In nice weather, you will see people swimming, fishing, camping, and hiking.   To visit, there is a fee per vehicle – check out their fee schedule.   The area is officially open from early April through October.  The road gates are often closed during the off season based on weather.   There is camping available if you wanted to make a nice weekend trip, but reservations should be made in advance.

We started off our hike from the Fisherman’s Parking Area.  There were a few other vehicles there also, but they were all there for the fishing.  The lake is stocked with trout throughout the year.  Facing the lake, we started our hike on the left by heading up the Cliff Trail.  This trail was a short gradual climb with a few switchbacks before the trail levels out.  About .4 miles into the hike, there is a small outlook to the right from a rock that gives you a few obstructed views from the lake.  Continuing on the trail, it begins to descend and the lake gets back into view.  At .8 miles, you reach the lakeside and see the sign that shows the junction with the Lakeside Trail (a trail that wraps around the lake).   We took a few minutes to go out onto the sand and enjoy the views of the lake.   I saw a wood duck escorting a few ducklings on the far banks of the lake.

Dam End

The fisherman’s parking lot is located at the dam end of the lake. It is where our hike begins. Below: The trail starts off rocky; Overlook View.

Rocky Uphill Overlook Rock

We walked back behind the large building/gift shop, crossed a couple of bridges and rejoined the trail on the northwestern side of the bank.  We took the blue-blazed Blue Loop Trail, leading us past a few campsite areas before climbing up into the woods.  The trail is rockier, especially in the beginning, than the Cliff Trail and is steeper.  The trail climbed through a few switchbacks.  At 1.5 miles, you reach a junction shortly after a switchback with the Dam Trail.  This will be your return route.  Continue up the Blue Loop Trail, which begins to take an uphill climb to the left up the mountain.  At 1.75 miles, you reach Lookout Rock.  We took some time there to enjoy the view and then went back the way we came until we reached the junction with the Dam Trail.  We took this trail to the left, which leads steeply down the mountain.  You begin to see the lake through the trees again and we reached the lakeside around 2.25 miles.  We continued on the trail until it reached a small bridge that crossed over the dam stream and led back to the parking lot.

Enjoying the View

Adam takes in a beach/lake view. Below: Services are typically open April through October; Trails are well marked; Adam hikes the Blue Loop Trail.

Sherando Beach Area trailsystem uphill

One thing that was going through my mind during the hike is this would be great for a family outing.  Grab your family for a quick hike followed by a picnic by the lake.  Make a weekend of it if you want to do some camping, swimming, and fishing.

Christine Says…

I enjoy playing in the snow, but I’m very ready for warmer weather. I want to see flowers blooming. I want to feel warm sunshine on my face. I’m so ready to see a canopy of green across the mountaintops.  I have spring fever.  So, I was especially thankful for a particularly warm and sunny Saturday because it gave us a chance to get out and hike.

We chose Sherando Lake, mainly because it was nearby and easy. It would have been a great day to go on a longer hike, but Adam was still getting over a bad cold.  And I was not willing to spend more than an hour in the car. I had spent the past two weekends in a 12-passenger van, making a 15 hour ride to and from the Florida panhandle and was still a bit road weary.

Lookout Rock

Lookout Rock provides a nice view of the valley, lake and mountains. Below: Adam climbs his way toward Lookout Rock; Checking out the view, Making the descent.

Climb View descent

My trip to Florida was a service-learning trip with a group of nine JMU students.  We traveled to a Nature Conservancy preserve – Apalachicola Bluffs & Ravines to do a week’s worth of environmental work.  We camped, we hiked, we learned about the local ecosystem, and most importantly – we planted 90,000 plugs of native wiregrass seed that will be used to restore the natural habitat of that part of Florida.  It was hard work, but I think we made a difference. We even had one free day on our trip. We chose to spend it spotting manatees, gators, and other wildlife at Wakulla Springs State Park.  If you want to see more photos and read more about my service trip, I’ve uploaded a large set of captioned photos to my Flickr account.

Now, back to Sherando Lake!  I had been to the lake a couple times before, but had never actually taken the time to hike any of the trails in the area. I was pleasantly surprised by the trail system.  There is something for everyone – a practically flat trail that goes along the lake shore, a steeper trail around the lake that offers a couple nice views, and a connection into the larger, longer trail system along the Blue Ridge Parkway.

I liked sitting on the sand and enjoying the pretty lake view, and I really enjoyed climbing up to Lookout Rock on the Blue Loop Trail.  The rocky outcropping provides a nice view of the lake and the mountains beyond.  Although the snow was gone on the trails we walked, we could still see plenty of snow on the distant, higher ridges.

Spillway

The hike ends after crossing a cement bridge over the spillway. Below: The stream leading away from the lake; Christine crossing the concrete bridge, Blue Mountain Brewery food and brewery.

Stream Bridge Blue Mountain Brewey Blue Mountain

The walk back down from Lookout Rock was really steep and slick, especially with the thick bed of dry, fallen leaves.  Once we reached the bottom of the descent, we crossed a concrete bridge beneath the spillway and returned to our car.  We finished hiking a little bit before noon, so we decided to make the short drive to have lunch at Blue Mountain Brewery (near Afton Mountain).  They have great food and great beer.  Adam enjoyed a flight of nine different beers and I tried their Daugava Baltic Porter.  I think everyone in central Virginia had the same idea to visit the brewery for an outdoor lunch.  The place was packed, but it was a perfect ending to the day.

Trail Notes

  • Distance – 2.5 miles
    (Check out the stats from Map My Hike)*
  • Elevation Change – 998 ft.
  • Difficulty –  2.  The uphill to the Lookout Rock is a little steep, but overall most people should be able to do it.
  • Trail Conditions – 4.  This is well-traveled, so you should find the trail to be in good shape. 
  • Views  3.  Nice views of the lake from Lookout Rock and mountains around.  Some obstruction, but overall a decent view. 
  • Streams/Waterfalls – 2.  There is a small man-made water dam that creates a nice fall look.  The lake creates a picturesque setting. 
  • Wildlife – 2.  You shouldn’t expect a lot of larger wildlife.  We saw a pileated woodpecker swooping across our car when we arrived.
  • Ease to Navigate – 4.  The only place you may need to figure out is where to pick up the trail after going to the other side of the lake.
  • Solitude –1.  On a nice day, you’ll see plenty of people here.  Most will be near the lake, but expect some people at Lookout Rock. 

Download a Trail Map (PDF)

Directions to trailhead:  From I-64, take Exit 96 just east of Stuarts Draft. Go south on State Route 624, which becomes State Route 664 at Lyndhurst. Continue south on State Route 664 approximately 8 miles to the entrance to the Sherando Lake Recreation Area on the right. The gatehouse is approximately 0.5 miles ahead which will take the fee for your vehicle.  Past the gatehouse, you’ll take a right to the fisherman’s parking lot.  Park there and make your way to the left for the Cliff Trail.

MapMyHike is not necessarily accurate, as the GPS signal fades in and out – but it still provides some fun and interesting information.

3 Comments leave one →
  1. November 4, 2016 8:36 am

    My favorite place on earth! Planning a Yoga Hike this weekend with the 3 Amigos!
    http://www.birdseedyoga.com

    Like

  2. March 31, 2014 12:25 pm

    Your article is timely – I am taking a group of Girl Scouts to Sherando Lake in 3 weeks, so it is nice to have detailed hiking information, directions etc. Thanks for all the time you invest documenting your hikes. Very helpful for those of us coming behind you!

    Like

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